Precast Concrete Bridges Installed to Improve Wetlands

Construction crews installed two bridges in the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area in California to create new habitat, improve wetlands management and support wildlife-friendly agriculture.

Daily Democrat
A 350-ton hydraulic truck crane placed the precast concrete bridges that replace narrow pipes regularly blocked by beavers and debris, improving drainage and water supply in the wildlife area.
A 350-ton hydraulic truck crane placed the precast concrete bridges that replace narrow pipes regularly blocked by beavers and debris, improving drainage and water supply in the wildlife area.
Daily Democrat

The Daily Democrat recently reported the installation of two precast concrete bridges at the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area in Yolo County, California as part of a larger construction project taking place this summer to create new habitat, improve wetlands management and support wildlife-friendly agriculture.

A 350-ton hydraulic truck crane placed the precast concrete bridges that replace narrow pipes regularly blocked by beavers and debris, improving drainage and water supply in the wildlife area.

The bridges are part of a $4 million project scheduled for completion in October. More improvements are planned for the summer of 2021, if additional funding is secured.

The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Conservancy and the Wildlife Conservation Board are jointly funding the summer 2020 project.

The bypass is a 16,770-acre wildlife area managed by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife with the intent of restoring and managing a variety of wildlife habitats in the Yolo Basin. The wildlife area plays a vital role for flood control, local agriculture, water resources and habitat for critical endangered species and other wildlife as well as provides valuable public access for education and recreation activities.

The investments in infrastructure will create 200 acres of new wetlands, increase the productivity of existing wetlands, improvement management for rice fields, reduce on-site flooding from the South Davis Drain and provide better access for the public and K-12 environmental education program.

“We are truly blessed to have such a vibrant Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area right here in Yolo County,” says California Department of Fish and Wildlife Area Manager Joe Hobbs. “This improvement project provides a much-needed upgrade that allows us to manage the area’s drainage so that our region’s wildlife species can continue to thrive.”

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